Unconventional Energy and U.S. National Security

  • Panel Discussion
Date:
Feb 6 2014 - 5:15pm to 7:30pm

Location:
Willard InterContinental Hotel
1401 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20004

 
On February 6, CNAS held an event featuring remarks on energy and national security byformer National Security Advisor Thomas E. Donilon and the rollout of a major new report of the CNAS Unconventional Energy and U.S. National Security Task Force, Energy Rush: Shale Production and U.S. National Security.  Download a full transcript of the event here. 
 
 
The event featured remarks by:
 
Thomas E. Donilon
Distinguished Fellow
Council on Foreign Relations
Former National Security Advisor
 

A presentation of the Report’s Key Findings by

Elizabeth Rosenberg
Senior Fellow and Director of the Energy, Environment and Security Program
Center for a New American Security
 
And remarks by the Unconventional Energy and U.S. National Security Task Force Co-Chairs
 
Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
Former Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs
 
Governor Bill Richardson
Founder, Richardson Center for Global Engagement
Former two-term governor of New Mexico,
U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations,
Secretary of the Department of Energy, and
15-year U.S. Congressman from New Mexico
 
Senator John Warner
Advisor and Fellow, The Pew Charitable Trusts
Senior Advisor at Hogan Lovells US LLP
Former Chairman of the Armed Services Committee,
30-year U.S. Senator from Virginia, and
Secretary of the Navy
 
 
About the Report
Energy Rush: Shale Production and U.S. National Security was written by Senior Fellow and Director of the Energy, Environment and Security Program Elizabeth Rosenberg with key insights from the Unconventional Energy and U.S. National Security Task Force, co-chaired by Ambassador Dobriansky, Governor Richardson and Senator Warner. In the report, the author examines the profound implications of U.S. unconventional energy production on energy markets and geopolitics, and finds that civilian and military policymakers must adapt policies and recast strategic relationships to better fit complex and volatile global energy markets.