Strategy and Statecraft

CNAS generates innovative policy ideas to guide American strategy and foreign policy in an era of accelerating change. Our work focuses on keeping the United States globally engaged through policies that foster U.S. security and prosperity. Today’s volatile global environment cries out for solutions to security, political and economic problems both new and old. This program aims to provide answers for how U.S. strategy can rapidly adapt to meet those challenges.

The CNAS Strategy and Statecraft team includes:

Related Content

  • May 11, 2015
  • Jacob Stokes, Julianne Smith
  • Press Notes

CNAS Press Note: Secretary Kerry’s Upcoming Meeting with Putin and Lavrov

Washington, May 11 – In advance of Secretary of State John Kerry’s meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, CNAS Strategy and Statecraft Program Director Julianne Smith and Bacevich Fellow Jacob Stokes have written a new Press Note, “Secretary Kerry...

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  • May 10, 2015
  • Ilan Goldenberg
  • In the News

Middle East: The Iran conversation

Syria’s misery shows no sign of ending; Libya is torn in half; the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant is making gains in Iraq; and Yemen is sliding into a humanitarian crisis. When Barack Obama hosts leaders from the Gulf at Camp David on Thursday, he will be confronted by a Middle East that is...

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  • May 7, 2015
  • Ilan Goldenberg, Robert D. Kaplan
  • Op-eds

The Geopolitics of the Iran Nuclear Deal

As the United States and Iran near an historic nuclear agreement there is an intense debate about whether a deal represents capitulation to Iranian interests in the Middle East or an opportunity to help stabilize the region.  If the United States and its partners learn the lessons of previous...

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  • April 24, 2015
  • Ben FitzGerald
  • In the News

Can the Defense Department Rekindle Romance With Silicon Valley?

After spending two decades largely ignoring the very Silicon Valley tech start-up culture that it helped bankroll in the 1970s and ’80s, questions remain about a new Defense Department push to reconnect with the California tech world, especially in a post-Snowden era where trust between the two...

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  • April 15, 2015
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
  • In the News

Ruble on the Rebound

The Russian ruble is rebounding, outpacing all other world currencies against the dollar this year. The 20 percent recovery this month alone stands in stark contrast to last year, when U.S. officials smugly pointed to Russia’s plummeting currency as proof that Western sanctions against Moscow for...

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  • April 14, 2015
  • Op-eds

Why I Write: A Veteran Reflects on Coming Home From War

Two years ago, I ran into a veteran buddy I hadn't seen in years. He was an Army officer who had just finished his final tour in Afghanistan and was preparing for life after the Army. He commented that, after his own tour, it seemed to him like I had been over there so early on in the war. I...

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  • April 14, 2015
  • Phillip Carter
  • In the News

VA building projects riddled with mistakes and cost overruns

There are hospital doors at the half-built ­Veterans Affairs medical center outside Denver that were supposed to cost $100 each but ended up ­running $1,400. There’s a $100-million-and-still-risingprice tag for an atrium and concourse with curving blond-wood walls and towering glass windows. And...

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  • April 10, 2015
  • Phillip Carter
  • In the News

Study: Former troops at high risk for suicide

A massive study of post-9/11 service members show that troops at the highest risk for suicide are those who serve less than a full enlistment and, in particular, those who leave after less than a year — personnel whose discharges may be related to mental health issues but normally are ineligible...

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  • April 8, 2015
  • Robert D. Kaplan
  • Op-eds

America will lose patience with European appeasement

Appeasement is an age-old tactic of diplomacy. It can be a defensible one, but not as a frame of mind for an entire continent. Yet no word captures the general mood of Europe better than appeasement. Europeans, it has been said, cherish freedom but do not want to sacrifice anything for it. Only...

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  • April 3, 2015
  • Julianne Smith, Richard Fontaine
  • In the News

Anti-Access/Area Denial Isn’t Just for Asia Anymore

If there’s one set of foreign military capabilities that has garnered U.S. attention in recent years, it’s those related to anti-access and area denial. Even the most acronym-constrained policymakers regularly cite A2/AD and its challenge to American power projection in the western Pacific. And...

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