Strategy and Statecraft

CNAS generates innovative policy ideas to guide American strategy and foreign policy in an era of accelerating change. Our work focuses on keeping the United States globally engaged through policies that foster U.S. security and prosperity. Today’s volatile global environment cries out for solutions to security, political and economic problems both new and old. This program aims to provide answers for how U.S. strategy can rapidly adapt to meet those challenges.

The CNAS Strategy and Statecraft team includes:

Related Content

  • June 29, 2016
  • Elbridge Colby
  • Op-eds

Don't Scrap America's Alliances. Fix Them.

Does the United States benefit from having allies? In recent months, Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, has voiced skepticism about the value of core American allies in Europe and East Asia. Trump argues that U.S. allies are free riding off the United States, and that...

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  • June 27, 2016
  • Julianne Smith
  • In the News

Brexit to Complicate Trans-Atlantic Cooperation

WASHINGTON—The U.K.’s decision to leave the European Union dramatically expands the portfolio of foreign-policy challenges the next U.S. president will inherit, complicating critical decisions to address instability across the globe. President Barack Obama is unexpectedly embarking on a high-...

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  • June 25, 2016
  • Julianne Smith
  • In the News

Britain faces an uncertain reality after vote to exit

LONDON—Britain's vote to leave the European Union sent shock waves rippling across the globe Friday, setting off tumult in financial markets, forcing the country's prime minister to resign and shattering the stability of an alliance that created the continent's shared economy and ended the ruinous...

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  • June 25, 2016
  • Julianne Smith
  • Op-eds

How Brexit Will Change the World

The results of the Brexit referendum are in, and it is chaos. The United Kingdom is leaving the European Union. Prime Minister David Cameron is stepping down. The Dow Jones has fallen 611 points in a day. The decision has rattled the world, and even the pro-Brexit British voters seemed stunned. “I...

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  • June 24, 2016
  • Julianne Smith
  • In the News

Britain looks to next steps after historic vote to leave European Union

Britain’s vote to leave the European Union sent shock waves rippling across the globe Friday, setting off tumult in financial markets, forcing the country’s prime minister to resign and shattering the stability of an alliance that created the continent’s shared economy and ended the ruinous wars...

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  • June 24, 2016
  • Adam Klein
  • Op-eds

Adam Klein Discusses the Security Implications of Brexit

The British referendum to leave the European Union is a massive shock to the European political order. But what are its implications for U.S. foreign policy? Conventional wisdom dictates that a vote for Brexit was the undesirable outcome for the United States. That is probably right: any economic...

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  • June 24, 2016
  • Rachel Rizzo
  • In the News

Officials In The U.S And Europe Worry Brexit Will Distract From Security Concerns

WASHINGTON/ISTANBUL — Security officials and experts said in the wake of the Brexit vote that they did not expect intelligence cooperation between the U.S. and its transatlantic partners to shift fundamentally, but expressed fears that tussles over Britain’s exit from the European Union could...

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  • June 24, 2016
  • Julianne Smith
  • In the News

British exit from E.U. could pose major foreign policy challenges for U.S.

Britain’s decision to leave the European Union could make it more difficult to maintain transatlantic agreement on sanctions on Russia over Ukraine, and distract Britain and the E.U. from other pressing foreign policy issues as they disentangle their ties, analysts said Friday. On the day after...

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  • June 14, 2016
  • Peter Harrell
  • In the News

'Brexit' could have economic, political downsides for U.S. business

J.P. Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon visited the banking giant's British corporate office in the seaside city of Bournemouth this month to deliver a chilling message to employees: “As many as 4,000” J.P. Morgan jobs in the United Kingdom — about a quarter of the U.K. workforce — could be cut if Britons ...

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