Strategy and Statecraft

CNAS generates innovative policy ideas to guide American strategy and foreign policy in an era of accelerating change. Our work focuses on keeping the United States globally engaged through policies that foster U.S. security and prosperity. Today’s volatile global environment cries out for solutions to security, political and economic problems both new and old. This program aims to provide answers for how U.S. strategy can rapidly adapt to meet those challenges.

The CNAS Strategy and Statecraft team includes:

Related Content

  • August 17, 2015
  • Phillip Carter
  • In the News

Ben Bernanke: Being In the Military Won't Actually Help You in the Real World

The U.S. military has spent tens of millions of dollars on TV advertising promoting the armed forces as a great way to acquire skills and training that will pay dividends in the private sector. But on Monday, one of the country’s most respected observers of the U.S. labor force, former Federal...

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  • August 13, 2015
  • Elbridge Colby
  • Op-eds

The United States, NATO, and Dissuading Russian Aggression

This past June, U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter announced that Washington would pre-position heavy military equipment in eastern and central Europe, a move that would allow the United States to respond more quickly and effectively to Russian aggression toward NATO’s exposed eastern member...

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  • August 13, 2015
  • Michele Flournoy
  • In the News

Who is right about how our nation wages war, Samuel Huntington or Eliot Cohen?

Michele Flournoy, the person most likely to become defense secretary in a future Democratic administration, dissed the hell out of Samuel Huntington’s theory of civil-military relations the other day at the Future of War Conference. There is not a neat separation of civilian and military realms,...

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  • August 11, 2015
  • Van Jackson
  • Op-eds

What Crimea Tells Us About Asia's Future Wars

Crimea and the complex military occupation that now exists in Ukraine is an all too reasonable and underexplored model for future conflict in Asia. When we think about conflict in Asia, a handful of flashpoints come to mind: the Taiwan Strait, East China Sea, and the Korean Peninsula. Increasingly...

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  • August 10, 2015
  • Peter Harrell
  • Op-eds

How to constrain Iran's support for terrorism - and still make a deal

One of the major criticisms of the nuclear deal with Iran is that lifting economic sanctions will strengthen Iran’s ability to support terrorist groups and other activities that destabilize the Middle East. And it’s a real concern: Just last month, Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khameni gave a speech...

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  • August 7, 2015
  • Elbridge Colby
  • In the News

The Greatest Threat to America

In the modern world, dangers against Americans abound. U.S. decision-makers are confronted with myriad complex issues, including the Islamic State group and "lone-wolf" terrorists, China, cyber attacks from unknown hackers, al-Qaida, cyber attacks from known hackers, Iran, domestic budget cuts,...

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  • August 6, 2015
  • Dafna Rand
  • Op-eds

Security assistance isn't the quick fix the US thinks it is

Building partner capacity, or BPC, has become all the rage. But the recent capture of U.S.-trained rebels in Syria by the al Qaeda-affiliated al-Nusra front is the latest in a long list of developments that raises the question: Does BPC work? The answer: It depends. As we argue in a report...

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  • August 6, 2015
  • Robert D. Kaplan
  • Op-eds

From 1987: Robert D. Kaplan on Robert Conquest

At the height of the famine emergency in 1985, a few journalists sat around a restaurant table in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa, considering analogies for the food crisis in the Horn of Africa. Of course Biafra and Cambodia came to mind. But Robin Knight of U.S. News & World Report had...

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  • August 3, 2015
  • Julianne Smith
  • Op-eds

A Defining Moment for the Alliance?

Williams: To what extent is it fair to classify Europe's lack of investment in defense technology and national defense budgets as a threat to the capabilities of the Atlantic alliance? Smith: NATO is only as strong as its individual member states, which means that when members make insufficient...

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