Asia

CNAS examines key dimensions of U.S. foreign policy and national security strategy in Asia through its prominent Asia-Pacific Security Program, as well as its path breaking work on South Asia.

 

The Asia-Pacific Security Program seeks to inform the exercise of U.S. power and leadership in the Asia-Pacific region through a wide variety of research, publications and activities, including dialogues with officials, public events and expert working groups.  CNAS has made a significant commitment to the program because it recognizes that the region’s future security will be critical for both global growth and U.S. economic and national security interests.

 

The Asia-Pacific Security Program’s research agenda focuses on such issues as how the United States can rebalance its strategic priorities and resources over time to shape the region to account for China’s rise and how to refashion traditional alliances, build new partnerships and strengthen multilateral institutions.  For instance, a recent program report, The Emerging Asia Power Web, examines the rise of intra-Asian bilateral security ties, a new dynamic in the region. Ongoing initiatives include the CNAS Maritime Strategy Project; work on the future of U.S. alliances in Asia; and examination of potential changes in China’s national security policies, among others. 

 

The CNAS Asia-Pacific Security Program team includes:

 

FLASHPOINTS: The Asia-Pacific Security Program created Flashpoints, a tool that comprises a map and a timeline depicting major incidents that have occurred in the South and East China Seas since the mid-1950s. 

                                                                        

                                             ********

 

South Asia

CNAS also has a rich history of research on South Asia, to include influential work and policy recommendations on the strategic and operational dimensions of the war in Afghanistan, the importance of the relationship between the United States and India, and the future of U.S. engagement in this volatile but important region.


The CNAS South Asia team includes:

Related Content

  • September 26, 2014
  • Ely Ratner
  • In the News

Ilham Tohti and Islamic State: How China Defines Terrorism

Over at ChinaFile, Richard Bernstein and Ely Ratner discuss the possibility of the U.S. and China cooperating to fight terrorism. Bernstein argues that while such cooperation is desirable, in reality the prospects are hindered by Beijing’s tendency to label peaceful dissenters as “terrorists.”...

Read More

  • September 26, 2014
  • Ely Ratner
  • Op-eds

Should the U.S. Cooperate with China on Terrorism?

The question of U.S.-China counterterrorism cooperation is particularly salient in the context of National Security Advisor Susan Rice’s recent trip to Beijing, during which she reportedly urged China to join the U.S.-led coalition against ISIS in Iraq and Syria. This came on the heels of...

Read More

  • September 26, 2014
  • David W. Barno, USA (Ret.)
  • In the News

As Afghan inauguration approaches, friction within government still possible

  KABUL, Afghanistan — Although the power-sharing deal between Afghanistan’s rival political camps enables a new president to take office, it remains unclear whether the two groups can work together to implement sweeping constitutional changes and guide the nation after most foreign troops leave....

Read More

  • September 26, 2014
  • Richard Fontaine
  • Press Notes

CNAS Press Note: Key Issues for Indian Prime Minister Modi's U.S. Visit

Washington, September 26 – Center for a New American Security (CNAS) President Richard Fontaine has prepared a press note in anticipation of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi arrival today in New York for a five-day visit to the United States. Following an address in Madison Square Garden and...

Read More

  • September 25, 2014
  • Ely Ratner
  • In the News

Good Morning, Vietnam

The United States is reportedly edging closer to ending a decades-old arms embargo on Vietnam, propelled by China's aggressive behavior and particularly Beijing's heavy-handed search for energy riches in the South China Sea. Rolling back the embargo, as proponents such as Sen. John McCain have...

Read More

  • September 25, 2014
  • Amy Chang
  • In the News

Taiwan's Investigation Of Xiaomi Is As Much About Politics As Cybersecurity

The Taiwanese government’s investigation of Xiaomi, a popular smartphone manufacturer based in mainland China, for a security breach reveals the extent to which Taiwan, whose economic integration with China in recent years has sparked controversy throughout the island, has sought to allay national...

Read More

  • September 24, 2014
  • Blog Posts

Beyond Looking East: Greater Indian Involvement in Maritime East Asia

The recent trip to India by Xi Jinping, the President of China, seemed to effectively offset the impression of strong India-Japan ties that was demonstrated during Narendra Modi’s visit to Japan several weeks prior. The new Indian Prime Minister invited Xi to his hometown in Gujarat on 17...

Read More

  • September 24, 2014
  • Patrick M. Cronin
  • In the News

Once-Banned Modi Embraced by U.S. as China Interests Mesh

A decade ago, the U.S. saw Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi as an international pariah. Next week he’ll address a sell-out crowd at Madison Square Garden and stroll down the red carpet at the White House. Modi starts a five-day trip to New York and Washington on Sept. 26, the first since he was...

Read More

  • September 23, 2014
  • Richard Fontaine
  • In the News

PM Narendra Modi's visit, a chance to progress on key Indo-US issues: Think tank

WASHINGTON: Underlining that Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit presents an opportunity for progress on key issues in Indo-US ties, a top American think tank has said the two countries must ensure that it is the beginning of "renewed attention" towards each other than a one-off attempt. "Once...

Read More

  • September 23, 2014
  • Richard Weitz
  • Op-eds

High-Profile Naval Visit Belies China’s Low-Profile Approach to Iran

Two Chinese warships paid a port call to Iran over the weekend, in advance of a four-day joint naval exercise with the Iranian navy that was reportedly to begin Monday. The visit highlights China’s ties with Iran, at a time when the outcome of international negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program...

Read More

Pages