Asia

CNAS examines key dimensions of U.S. foreign policy and national security strategy in Asia through its prominent Asia-Pacific Security Program, as well as its path breaking work on South Asia.

 

The Asia-Pacific Security Program seeks to inform the exercise of U.S. power and leadership in the Asia-Pacific region through a wide variety of research, publications and activities, including dialogues with officials, public events and expert working groups.  CNAS has made a significant commitment to the program because it recognizes that the region’s future security will be critical for both global growth and U.S. economic and national security interests.

 

The Asia-Pacific Security Program’s research agenda focuses on such issues as how the United States can rebalance its strategic priorities and resources over time to shape the region to account for China’s rise and how to refashion traditional alliances, build new partnerships and strengthen multilateral institutions.  For instance, a recent program report, The Emerging Asia Power Web, examines the rise of intra-Asian bilateral security ties, a new dynamic in the region. Ongoing initiatives include the CNAS Maritime Strategy Project; work on the future of U.S. alliances in Asia; and examination of potential changes in China’s national security policies, among others. 

 

The CNAS Asia-Pacific Security Program team includes:

 

FLASHPOINTS: The Asia-Pacific Security Program created Flashpoints, a tool that comprises a map and a timeline depicting major incidents that have occurred in the South and East China Seas since the mid-1950s. 

                                                                        

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South Asia

CNAS also has a rich history of research on South Asia, to include influential work and policy recommendations on the strategic and operational dimensions of the war in Afghanistan, the importance of the relationship between the United States and India, and the future of U.S. engagement in this volatile but important region.


The CNAS South Asia team includes:

 

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