Asia

CNAS examines key dimensions of U.S. foreign policy and national security strategy in Asia through its prominent Asia-Pacific Security Program, as well as its path breaking work on South Asia.

 

The Asia-Pacific Security Program seeks to inform the exercise of U.S. power and leadership in the Asia-Pacific region through a wide variety of research, publications and activities, including dialogues with officials, public events and expert working groups.  CNAS has made a significant commitment to the program because it recognizes that the region’s future security will be critical for both global growth and U.S. economic and national security interests.

 

The Asia-Pacific Security Program’s research agenda focuses on such issues as how the United States can rebalance its strategic priorities and resources over time to shape the region to account for China’s rise and how to refashion traditional alliances, build new partnerships and strengthen multilateral institutions.  For instance, a recent program report, The Emerging Asia Power Web, examines the rise of intra-Asian bilateral security ties, a new dynamic in the region. Ongoing initiatives include the CNAS Maritime Strategy Project; work on the future of U.S. alliances in Asia; and examination of potential changes in China’s national security policies, among others. 

 

The CNAS Asia-Pacific Security Program team includes:

  • Dr. Patrick M. Cronin - Senior Advisor and Senior Director
  • Dr. Mira Rapp-Hooper - Senior Fellow
  • Harry Krejsa - Research Associate

 

FLASHPOINTS: The Asia-Pacific Security Program created Flashpoints, a tool that comprises a map and a timeline depicting major incidents that have occurred in the South and East China Seas since the mid-1950s. 

                                                                        

                                             ********

 

South Asia

CNAS also has a rich history of research on South Asia, to include influential work and policy recommendations on the strategic and operational dimensions of the war in Afghanistan, the importance of the relationship between the United States and India, and the future of U.S. engagement in this volatile but important region.


The CNAS South Asia team includes:

Related Content

  • July 24, 2014
  • Richard Weitz
  • Op-eds

How Russia, China and the US can denuclearize North Korea

Despite their many differences over regional security and other issues, China, Russia, and the United States continue to collaborate to counter the nuclear and missile programs of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), though Moscow and Beijing still evince a reluctance to apply the...

Read More

  • July 23, 2014
  • Ely Ratner
  • Op-eds

Australia's new activism: The view from Washington

When US officials talk about the US-Australia alliance, they almost always highlight, as President Obama did in hisNovember 2011 speech in Canberra, that Australians have fought alongside Americans 'in every single major conflict of the past hundred years.' This is a fact to be celebrated, but ...

Read More

  • July 22, 2014
  • Kurt Campbell
  • Op-eds

Trouble at sea reveals the new shape of China’s foreign policy

China’s recent moves in the East and South China Seas – various military deployments, policy proclamations, provocative naval maneuvers and rhetorical stridency – pose serious challenges for how Sinologists have traditionally perceived China and its foreign policy pursuits. The conventional wisdom...

Read More

  • July 18, 2014
  • Patrick M. Cronin
  • In the News

Assertive China a 'boon to US image'

A SURVEY on global perceptions of the United States and China this week affirmed what many observers had already guessed - that the increasingly assertive behaviour from Beijing over the past year has been a boon to the US image. But while this presents a good opportunity for the US to push...

Read More

  • July 18, 2014
  • Richard Fontaine
  • Op-eds

In Japan’s defense change, context is everything

WASHINGTON/HONOLULU – The announcement by Japan’s government that it will reinterpret the country’s constitution and permit a greater range of military activity has evoked reactions across the spectrum. From outright opposition in Beijing and suspicion in Seoul, to unqualified support in...

Read More

  • July 15, 2014
  • Richard Fontaine, Patrick M. Cronin
  • Op-eds

The Case for U.S. Arms Sales to Vietnam

When Beijing built a deep-sea drilling platform squarely in Vietnam's exclusive economic zone earlier this summer, it once again flouted widely accepted rules and sought to extend its reach far into the South China Sea. Washington and its Asian partners are struggling to calibrate an appropriate...

Read More

  • July 15, 2014
  • Richard Weitz
  • Op-eds

For Afghanistan Election, After Kerry Deal Comes the Hard Part

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s shuttle diplomacy in Kabul this weekend paved the way to resolving Afghanistan’s current election crisis, while helping to establish a potential framework for addressing more-enduring problems embedded in that country’s political system. In so doing, Kerry’s...

Read More

  • July 15, 2014
  • David W. Barno, USA (Ret.)
  • In the News

Obama’s Counterterror Plan Has New Doubters: His Own Generals and Spies

The idea of pulling nearly all American troops out of Afghanistan in 2016 suddenly seems pretty lousy, after so much of Iraq has collapsed under a similar scenario. When President Obama announced his plan to leave Afghanistan by the end of 2016, U.S. intelligence said it could be done safely. Now...

Read More

  • July 14, 2014
  • David W. Barno, USA (Ret.)
  • In the News

Afghanistan's Parliament May Do Better Than Iraq's

America’s Congress may be divided, but Iraq’s parliament can’t even choose new leadership to help repeal jihadist invaders fighting 50 miles from its capital. Meanwhile, over in Afghanistan, Secretary of State John Kerry has swooped in to broker a deal to reshape the parliamentary system. Iraq has...

Read More

  • July 11, 2014
  • Ely Ratner
  • In the News

US-China relations: Head to head

If a get-together of bureaucrats could solve the world’s thorniest political problems, then the US and China would be on a strong footing. Several hundred officials from both countries held a two-day meeting in Beijing this week that brought together almost every branch of their governments. The...

Read More

Pages