September 19, 2017

Congress must reassert itself on use of military force

By Andrew Swick and Amy Schafer

Last Wednesday the Senate quietly rejected a proposal by Kentucky Senator Rand Paul to rescind the 2001 and 2002 Authorizations for the Use of Military Force (AUMF), which would have forced Congress to take a clear stance on the president’s actions overseas.

The Senate’s decision closely follows the announcement of President Trump’s new strategy for the war in Afghanistan, which was notably light on details and lacking in measures of success. By voting “no” on Senator Paul’s amendment, the Senate continues to abdicate their constitutional role in U.S. foreign policy, allowing the president to deploy American forces to places like Afghanistan without accountability.

Read the full op-ed in The Hill.

  • Reports
    • November 20, 2019
    Make Good Choices, DoD

    In a new report, Susanna V. Blume and Molly Parrish offer a deep dive into how the U.S. Department of Defense makes decisions about what the U.S. military needs, what to buy a...

    By Susanna V. Blume & Molly Parrish

  • Video
    • November 20, 2019
    Results of the second Pentagon audit

    Bob Hale discusses takeaways from the Department of Defense’s latest audit, and the impacts it’s having on the agency’s culture.Watch the full conversation on Government Matte...

    By Robert F. Hale

  • Commentary
    • The American Interest
    • November 8, 2019
    The Enduring Relevance of Reagan’s Westminster Speech

    Editor’s Note: This is the third in a series of three essays, commissioned by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute, examining the legacy of Reagan’s Westmin...

    By Richard Fontaine

  • Podcast
    • November 8, 2019
    Friday Roundtable

    On the Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Podcast, Robert F. Hale joins Todd Harrison, the director of defense budget analysis and the Aerospace Security Project at...

    By Robert F. Hale

View All Reports View All Articles & Multimedia