Duyeon Kim

Adjunct Senior Fellow, Asia-Pacific Security Program

Research Areas

Duyeon Kim is an Adjunct Senior Fellow with the Asia-Pacific Security Program at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS). Her expertise includes the two Koreas, nuclear nonproliferation, arms control, East Asian relations and geopolitics, U.S. nuclear policy, and security. She is a Columnist for the The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and a Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the Korean Peninsula Future Forum, a non-partisan think tank in Seoul founded and run by former South Korean national security advisor Chun Yung-woo. Kim was an Associate in the Nuclear Policy and Asia programs at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and previously a Senior Fellow and Deputy Director of Non-Proliferation at the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation in Washington, DC.

Kim’s writings have appeared in leading publications including Foreign Affairs and Foreign Policy. She is a frequent media commentator appearing on major networks including CNN, BBC, CBS, and NBC, and she is widely quoted in leading print media including The New York Times, The Washington Post, AP, Bloomberg, Donga Ilbo, Yonhap News, and The Japan Times.

Kim is a member of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific (CSCAP) U.S. Committee, the Fissile Materials Working Group, the National Committee on North Korea, the Council of Korean Americans, and the bilateral Korean-American Association.

In her first career, Kim served as the Foreign Ministry Correspondent and Unification Ministry Correspondent for South Korea’s Arirang TV News as part of the exclusive South Korean press corps covering the Six Party Talks, North Korea, South Korean politics and foreign policy, inter-Korean relations, Northeast Asian relations, and U.S. foreign policy.

Kim holds an M.S. in Foreign Service from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service, and a B.A. in English/Literature from Syracuse University. Kim has native proficiency in Korean and English.

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