December 27, 2012

Asia's Pivotal Power

By Richard Fontaine

A resurgent Asian nation has just elevated hawkish nationalists to the pinnacle of power. Its maritime conflicts with neighbors raise the risk of military confrontation along key corridors of world trade. Memories of past national greatness infuse officials with a determination to compete for regional leadership. The country's re-emergence could rewrite the geopolitical map of Asia.

No, it's not China. Japan is set to surprise the world and change its region if it can reverse the economic decline that has led many to write off its influence.

Read the full article at The Wall Street Journal.

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