August 04, 2018

Commentary: Success, or failure, of new Army Command rests on Congress

In July, the U.S. Army announced that Austin will be the location for its new Futures Command headquarters. The command, intended to be the spearhead of the Army’s modernization effort, will direct the research and development of new military technologies and build partnerships with civilian innovators in academia and industry.

Futures Command has clear objectives, the authority of a four-star Army command, and an innovation-rich environment to work with in Austin. Rarely does a team — in any field or at any level — find itself in such a favorable position and with the power to see its projects through to execution.

Despite these conditions, Futures Command has a daunting mission ahead of it — one that it may not be able to achieve: The command is charged with nothing less than overhauling and modernizing the U.S. Army, one of the most cumbersome and bureaucratic organizations in the world.

Read the full op-ed in the Austin-American Statesman.

  • Commentary
    • Foreign Policy
    • February 19, 2024
    How Ukraine Can Help Itself

    The challenge is not how to innovate but how to scale up production, given skilled labor shortages, supply chain bottlenecks, corruption, and Russian attacks....

    By Franz-Stefan Gady

  • Reports
    • February 8, 2024
    Evolution Not Revolution

    This report concludes that drones have transformed the battlefield in the war in Ukraine, but in an evolutionary rather than revolutionary fashion. While tactical innovation a...

    By Stacie Pettyjohn

  • Reports
    • February 7, 2024
    “DIU 3.0”

    Foreword By Richard Fontaine Rapid technological change touches virtually every aspect of life today. This includes defense and national security, and for good reason: To main...

    By Douglas A. Beck

  • Commentary
    • Stars and Stripes
    • January 25, 2024
    The Ukraine war and the myth of a permanent all-volunteer force

    When Russia annexed Crimea in 2014, many heralded a new era of warfare. Short wars waged by small professional forces seemed to be the way of the future. Authoritarian actors,...

    By Andrew Spafford

View All Reports View All Articles & Multimedia