March 26, 2019

Five Years after Crimea, What have We Learned About Sanctioning Russia?

By ​Neil Bhatiya

In March 2014, then-President Barack Obama signed the first tranche of executive orders imposing sanctions against the Russian Federation for its illegal invasion and annexation of Crimea. Five years later, the confrontation between the United States and Russia has come to dominate the national security conversation, driving unprecedented tensions in the trans-Atlantic relationship. It is also likely to feature prominently in foreign policy debates during the 2020 presidential election campaign.

Read the full article in World Politics Review.

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