April 04, 2017

Hungary’s Challenge to Trump

By Robert D. Kaplan

A shoe has dropped in Europe. A small shoe, but one with a loud bang on a marble floor. The government of pro-Russian populist Viktor Orban in Hungary has introduced legislation that threatens to end the academic freedom of Central European University in Budapest, a private American-Hungarian graduate institution founded in 1991 by the Hungarian-born billionaire George Soros. The University’s president, Michael Ignatieff, and his network of allies at Oxford and elsewhere in the liberal humanist elite world, will present this potentially tragic affair as a threat to the Western ideal itself. And they are not exaggerating. I would go further, though. Orban’s attempt to place his neo-authoritarian paws on the school is, in a larger sense, a geopolitical event.

Yes, Orban has been expanding government control for years already in many directions: in the media, in the courts, and so forth. But there is a new geopolitical context afoot. The United States has elected a President, Donald Trump, with an avowed transactional approach to Russian relations, shorn of the historical and moral obligations that America has traditionally felt towards Europe since World War II. Trump’s right-hand man in the White House, Steve Bannon, has even championed the cause of anti-European populists in Western Europe of the Orban-Putin mold. Elements of the new Administration are assumed to have had untoward and perhaps compromising ties with the Kremlin. Moreover, Trump’s Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, has no experience in public policy whatsoever and his only moral obligations in the past have been to shareholders at Exxon. Orban knows all this. He knows, too, that Soros, a philanthropist to Democratic Party causes with few equals, is no friend of Trump, to put it mildly. In sum, this is a power grab that Orban must think he can easily get away with.

Read the full article at The American Interest.

  • Podcast
    • May 14, 2021
    Nord Stream 2 and the Biden Administration, with Daniel Fried and Steven Pifer

    How can the transatlantic alliance manage the political and security challenges presented by the Nord Stream 2 pipeline? Daniel Fried and Steven Piferjoin Andrea Kendall-Taylo...

    By Andrea Kendall-Taylor & Jim Townsend

  • Podcast
    • May 7, 2021
    Blinken/Ukraine-Russia Tensions

    Andrea Kendall-Taylor discusses with host Carol Castiel the significance of Secretary of State Antony Blinken’s visit to Ukraine. Listen to the full episode from Voice of Ame...

    By Andrea Kendall-Taylor

  • Commentary
    • Foreign Affairs
    • May 3, 2021
    China and Russia’s Dangerous Convergence

    Any effort to address either Russia’s or China’s destabilizing behavior must now account for the two countries’ deepening partnership....

    By Andrea Kendall-Taylor & David Shullman

  • Podcast
    • April 30, 2021
    U.S. and Allied Withdrawal from Afghanistan, with Federica Mogherini and Lisa Curtis

    What does President Biden’s decision to withdraw all troops from Afghanistan mean for American allies? Federica Mogherini and Lisa Curtis join Andrea Kendall-Taylor and Jim To...

    By Carisa Nietsche, Andrea Kendall-Taylor, Federica Mogherini & Lisa Curtis

View All Reports View All Articles & Multimedia