February 13, 2015

Just Another Likely Russian Tactical Move

By Jacob Stokes

The cease-fire agreed to on Thursday by the leaders of Ukraine, Russia, Germany and France might represent a positive step on the road toward ending the year-long conflict in Ukraine. In order for it to hold, however, the Russians and their separatist proxy forces in eastern Ukraine must adhere to the terms of the agreement. That’s unlikely to happen.

Recent violence follows Russia’s decision to violate an earlier cease-fire agreement from September 2014 called the Minsk Protocol. The new agreement shares many of the same principles. It requires changes to Ukraine’s constitution, withdrawal of heavy weapons and creation of a special status for the breakaway regions of Donetsk and Luhansk. But many issues remain undecided according to news reports, including the exact line of truce and the degree of autonomy the breakaway republics will have.

Read the full article at U.S. News.

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