March 21, 2019

The Necessary Impact of Captain Marvel on the Military

By Emma Moore

"Captain Marvel" is behind the times for the military and for superheroes; and it is the movie we deserve. It tells us what we already knew: that women serve (admirably, successfully); that white women, black women and single moms are patriotic and want to serve in the military; that women save the day even when they are sassy, irreverent and confused. The movie's critical and box office success points out trends the military must acknowledge: women and girls want to push themselves and want to serve.

Without deliberate efforts to recruit and retain women, half the population will remain out of reach and the military will miss out on top talent.

"Captain Marvel" fills a gap in the Marvel and film universe: everyone deserves to be told they can be a superhero. Carol Danvers (DBA Captain Marvel) is not set up to be, and doesn't try to be, a female superhero à la Wonder Woman, who is enigmatic, just, and selfless. Grounded in warrior ethos, Carol "scoffs at authority, drives herself to extremes and sometimes loses her temper ... and she is not here to play." She is angry, she is confused, and she is much more relatable for those emotions. This runs counter to the criticism that "what's missing [in Captain Marvel], though is what helped make 'Wonder Woman' an exemplary figure of female empowerment two years ago: unforced warmth, along with strength, and flashes of delight."

Read the full article on Military.com.

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