November 19, 2015

Diminishing Returns? The Future of Economic Coercion

By Eric Lorber and Peter Feaver

Eric Lorber, an Adjunct Fellow in the Energy, Economics, and Security Program, and Peter Feaver, a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Duke University, have written a new report, “Diminishing Returns? The Future of Economic Coercion.” The report lays out the success of recent financial sanctions, details obstacles to their continued effectiveness, discusses how other countries like China may use similar tools moving forward, and makes recommendations for how the United States can keep its sanctions tools strong.

Authors

  • Eric Lorber

  • Peter Feaver

    CNAS Board of Advisor, Alexander F. Hehmeyer Professor, Duke University

    Peter D. Feaver (Ph.D., Harvard, 1990) is the Alexander F. Hehmeyer Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Duke University and Director of the Triangle Institute ...

  • Reports
    • January 21, 2021
    Sanctions by the Numbers

    Russia is the second-most sanctioned state by the United States in the past decade, with 742 designations....

    By Francis Shin

  • Reports
    • January 14, 2021
    Sanctions by the Numbers

    Sanctions designations remained high in 2020, with 777 designations compared to 785 in 2019....

    By Sam Dorshimer & ​Francis Shin

  • Reports
    • December 17, 2020
    America’s Use of Coercive Economic Statecraft

    Policymakers will continue to intensively use a growing array of coercive economic tools, including tariffs, sanctions, trade controls, and investment restrictions....

    By Elizabeth Rosenberg, Peter Harrell, Paula J. Dobriansky & Adam Szubin

  • Commentary
    • December 16, 2020
    Sharper: 2020

    2020 featured an ever-evolving series of national security challenges....

    By Sam Dorshimer, Nathalie Grogan, Emily Jin, Chris Estep & Cole Stevens

View All Reports View All Articles & Multimedia