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Virtual Report Launch: Coercive Economic Measures in the U.S.-China Relationship

Apr 24, 2020
10:00am to 11:00am


On April 24, 2020, the Center for a New American Security (CNAS) hosted a virtual public event on coercive economic measures in the U.S.-China relationship. Over recent years both countries have begun using coercive economic measures, such as export controls, sanctions, and trade and investment controls, as mainstream instruments of foreign policy and national security. This economic statecraft is practiced differently by Washington and Beijing, but policymakers in both countries have established that it will be a core source of leverage and projection of power in their bilateral competition.

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This panel examined: (1) how both countries have increased their use of coercive economic measures to achieve an expanding set of security goals, (2) current trends in the United States’ and China’s use of these tools, and (3) the economic and political impact of the use of these tools in U.S.-China competition.

The event coincided with the release of the new CNAS report titled A New Arsenal for Competition: Coercive Economic Measures in the U.S.-China Relationship by Peter Harrell, Elizabeth Rosenberg, and Ashley Feng.

Featuring a Panel Discussion with: Peter Harrell Adjunct Senior Fellow Energy, Economics, and Security Program Center for a New American Security

Damien Ma Director, Think Tank The Paulson Institute

Elizabeth Rosenberg Senior Fellow and Program Director Energy, Economics, and Security Program Center for a New American Security

Ashley Feng Research Associate Energy, Economics, and Security Program Center for a New American Security

Read the report:

Energy, Economics, & Security

A New Arsenal for Competition

Executive Summary The United States and China have long used coercive economic measures to advance both economic and foreign policy objectives. In recent years, however, both ...

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