February 24, 2017

Beyond palace intrigue: How North Korea's antics threaten US interests

By Harry Krejsa

Last week in Malaysia, North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un’s estranged half brother was assassinated in shockingly public fashion.

Apparently poisoned by two young women as he walked through Kuala Lumpur International Airport, Kim Jong-nam’s death appears to be the latest example of his tyrannical brother’s enthusiasm for violence that is both bizarre and cruel.

Yet Kim Jong-un’s murderous antics are not merely palace intrigue; his brother’s death is the latest in an effort to cleanse the North Korean government of people with whom the international community could quietly communicate, or even exert influence. Kim Jong-un is ruthlessly isolating himself and his government from the outside world — and in so doing, further deepening the threat faced by the United States and its allies.

Read the full article at The Hill.

  • Reports
    • January 8, 2020
    Total Competition

    China’s coercive attempts to wield hegemonic control over the South China Sea threaten the sovereignty of Southeast Asian states and international freedom of the seas, both of...

    By Patrick M. Cronin & Ryan Neuhard

  • Commentary
    • Foreign Policy
    • December 27, 2019
    The U.S.-Chinese Trade War Just Entered Phase 2

    The Trump administration’s “phase one” trade deal with China may mark the end of the first chapter of the trade conflict between the United States and China, which saw Washing...

    By Peter Harrell

  • Video
    • December 19, 2019
    CNAS: Bold Ideas for National Security

    This year, CNAS experts brought bold ideas and bipartisan cooperation to the national security conversation. In 2020, the CNAS team will continue tackling the biggest security...

    By Susanna V. Blume, Kara Frederick, Kayla M. Williams, Loren DeJonge Schulman, Richard Fontaine, Kristine Lee, Andrea Kendall-Taylor, Ely Ratner, Paul Scharre, Elizabeth Rosenberg & Carrie Cordero

  • Reports
    • December 18, 2019
    Crossed Wires

    The United States’ current diplomacy with North Korea has enduring implications for its strategic competition with China....

    By Kristine Lee, Daniel Kliman & Joshua Fitt

View All Reports View All Articles & Multimedia