November 11, 2014

Can China Make Peace in the South China Sea?

By Ely Ratner

Dr. Ely Ratner, senior fellow and deputy director of the Asia-Pacific Security Program, argues that in recent years, China become not only more assertive but has also been increasingly engaging in unilateral coercion to advance its claims in the South China Sea. He points out that during President Barack Obama’s first term, Chinese leaders generally framed their assertiveness as necessary responses to the provocations of other nations. Dr. Ratner's essay is part of a Center for American Progress volume that highlights some of the most important security challenges the United States and China are facing in the Asia-Pacific region.

Read Dr. Ratner's essay, "Can China Make Peace in the South China Sea?" here.

Download the full volume at the Center for American Progress.

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