April 06, 2018

The Malicious Use of Artificial Intelligence: Forecasting, Prevention, and Mitigation

By Paul Scharre

Artificial intelligence and machine learning capabilities are growing

at an unprecedented rate. These technologies have many widely
beneficial applications, ranging from machine translation to medical
image analysis. Countless more such applications are being
developed and can be expected over the long term. Less attention
has historically been paid to the ways in which artificial intelligence
can be used maliciously. This report surveys the landscape of
potential security threats from malicious uses of artificial intelligence
technologies, and proposes ways to better forecast, prevent, and
mitigate these threats. We analyze, but do not conclusively resolve,
the question of what the long-term equilibrium between attackers and
defenders will be. We focus instead on what sorts of attacks we are
likely to see soon if adequate defenses are not developed.

Read the full article at MaliciousAIReport

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