September 16, 2015

Lessons from Russia and the Future of Sanctions

By Peter Harrell

Peter Harrell, an Adjunct Senior Fellow in the Center for a New American Security (CNAS) Energy, Economics, and Security Program, examines what led U.S. policymakers to develop new sanctions tools for Russia and assesses their effectiveness now and for the future.

Authors

  • Peter Harrell

    Adjunct Senior Fellow, Energy, Economics and Security Program

    Peter Harrell is an adjunct senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, where he focuses on the intersection of economics and national security. Research interest...

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