Technology and National Security

The Technology and National Security Program explores the nexus of strategy, technology and business to develop practical ideas that capitalize on opportunities, and mitigate risks, associated with the rapid pace of technological change. 

Technology has had a profound impact on warfare since the beginning of armed conflict. We are now living through a period of unprecedented technological change that impacts all areas of society and has significant implications for national security.  

CNAS is in a unique position to address this problem space as an independent, non-partisan think tank that maintains strong relationships with government, technology businesses and research organizations. CNAS' work on technology and national security aims to enable national security professionals in government and industry to capitalize on opportunities and mitigate risks associated with rapid technological change.

The CNAS Technology and National Security team includes:

 

Related Content

  • July 26, 2016
  • Jerry Hendrix
  • In the News

US Navy's Sixth-Generation F/A-XX Fighter: Just a 'Super' Super Hornet?

The United States Navy does not appear to have a coherent plan for how its carrier-based tactical aircraft will operate in the post-2030 threat environment. Sources tell The National Interest that even the Navy’s planned F/A-XX will not solve the service’s challenges in operating in an anti-access...

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  • July 11, 2016
  • Alexandra Sander
  • Op-eds

Game of Drones: What Happens When Everyone Has Killer Robots?

At the end of June, the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) released a report counting U.S. counterterrorism drone strikes outside areas of active hostilities and resulting combatant and non-combatant deaths. The public release of these figures is part of a greater Obama administration ...

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  • July 10, 2016
  • Elbridge Colby
  • In the News

Britain Needs a New Place to Park Its Nukes

Within days of entering office, every British prime minister must carry out a grim task: writing letters of “last resort” to the commanders of the country’s nuclear-armed submarines. The letters are written out in long hand and placed in sealed safes in each of the nation’s four Vanguard-class ...

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  • June 27, 2016
  • Jerry Hendrix
  • In the News

Why the US Navy Should Fear China's New 093B Nuclear Attack Submarine

Is China’s new Type 093B nuclear-powered attack submarine on par with the U.S. Navy’s Improved Los Angeles-class boats? At least some U.S. naval analysts believe so and contend that the introduction of the new People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) submarines is an indication of just how quickly...

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  • June 22, 2016
  • Patrick M. Cronin
  • In the News

China's Aerospace Defense Industry Sacks US Military Technology

The Aviation Industry Corporation of China (AVIC) is the main supplier of military planes and helicopters to the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF). They produce the J-20 stealth fighter, FC-1, and FC-8 fighters, the 5th-generation FC-31 stealth fighter, and aerial reconnaissance and...

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  • June 20, 2016
  • Ben FitzGerald
  • Videos

Defense Innovation - Between a Rock and a Cliché

  • June 15, 2016
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
  • In the News

Potential Iranian deal for airliners thrusts Boeing into risky political debate

Boeing could hardly step into a more sensitive, touchy deal than the imminent agreement to sell about 100 passenger jets to the Islamic Republic of Iran. With the sale, Boeing faces unique political risks here in the United States — with potential blowback among Americans opposed to last year’s...

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  • June 13, 2016
  • Jerry Hendrix
  • Op-eds

Put the X-47B Back to Work — As a Tanker

Salty Dog 501 and 502 sit silent in their hangars, their expected contributions to naval aviation unfulfilled. Before the Navy spends time and money ginning up another expensive new UAV, it should put its X-47Bs back to work. Authorized for construction in 2007, the X-47B prototypes represent a...

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  • June 1, 2016
  • Kelley Sayler, Paul Scharre
  • In the News

An Air Force Without Pilots? Critics Call for an Unmanned B-21 Bomber

The future of the Air Force’s bomber and fighter fleet may not involve human pilots. A pair of experts argue in Defense One that the new B-21 bomber, also known as the Long Range-Strike Bomber, should be designed with an unmanned option that can be used as soon as the plane is operational.   To...

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  • May 31, 2016
  • Paul Scharre, Kelley Sayler
  • Op-eds

The B-21 Bomber Should Be Unmanned on Day 1

While plans for the B-21 — née Long Range Strike-Bomber — have long included an unmanned option, Air Force officials have shown little interest in having that capability on Day One of the plane’s service life. This is unwise; an unmanned option would increase the U.S. military’s operational...

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