September 14, 2017

China has a plan to cripple North Korea, so let's work with Beijing

By Peter Harrell

The United States and North Korea are in a dangerous cycle of escalating military threats and rhetorical exchanges. The risk of a miscalculation that results in catastrophic civilian consequences and global economic shocks is high. To get off the escalatory ladder of military escalation and to build economic pressure to force change in Pyongyang, Washington should embrace both additional economic pressure and China’s so-called “freeze for freeze” proposal in which North Korea would suspend nuclear and ballistic missile tests and the U.S. would suspend large-scale joint military exercises with South Korea.

Read the full op-ed here.

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