February 23, 2017

Grow the US military but do it right, not just fast

By Amy Schafer and Loren DeJonge Schulman

Topping the 2017 agendas for President Trump, Secretary of Defense James Mattis, and Armed Services Committee leadership are plans to grow the military.

They are each glossing over any differences among them on America’s role in the world in pursuit of their mutual objective of rebuilding the force, as spotlighted in the memorandum Trump signed out at the Pentagon last Friday.  After six years under arbitrary and counterproductive budget caps, few in the defense community are eager to scrutinize this consensus.

Their desire to grow the force quickly, however, should not overcome their duty to taxpayers and the troops themselves. They must grow the force with careful intention and a clear goal in mind.

Read the full article at The Hill.

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