Energy, Economics and Security

The Energy, Economics and Security program analyzes the changing global marketplace and implications for U.S. national security and foreign policy. Shifting energy dynamics, the geopolitical challenges associated with a changing climate and powerful economic forces all shape U.S. global leadership. In a highly interconnected global system, leaders must increasingly leverage energy and financial assets to defend and promote U.S. national interests. The Energy, Economics and Security program develops practical strategies to help decision-makers understand, anticipate and respond.

The Energy, Economics and Security Team

Related Content

  • January 16, 2016
  • Peter Harrell
  • In the News

U.S. lifts ban on foreign units of American companies operating in Iran

The United States will allow foreign subsidiaries of American companies to trade with Iran as part of sanctions relief granted under an international nuclear deal, the U.S. Treasury Department said on Saturday. The move will give U.S. companies the chance of gaining a toehold in Iran. With a large...

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  • January 16, 2016
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
  • In the News

Oil glut dampens Iran’s hopes for big cash flows as sanctions lift

Iran is about to get a refresher course in the capricious nature of the oil market and the durable nature of economic sanctions. When U.S. and other international sanctions were tightened in 2012 and took nearly 700,000 barrels a day of Iranian crude oil off world markets, the price of an average...

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  • December 17, 2015
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
  • In the News

Islamic State's Money Is the Target of Finance Ministers at UN

In the first meeting of its kind, top finance ministers will preside over a United Nations Security Council vote to dismantle the financial network of Islamic State and choke off the extremist group’s access to money from oil and looting. The presence of Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew as chair,...

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  • December 15, 2015
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
  • In the News

The Billion-Dollar Caliphate

Last month, U.S. fighter jets unleashed airstrikes against oil fields, refineries, and hundreds of tanker trucks near the Syrian city of Deir Ezzor. Dubbed Operation Tidal Wave II, the attacks were the latest phase in a campaign to bomb the Islamic State into bankruptcy, striking at the heart of...

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  • December 10, 2015
  • Peter Harrell
  • Congressional Testimony

Peter Harrell before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources

CNAS Adjunct Senior Fellow Peter Harrell testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources to examine terrorism and the global oil markets.

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  • December 9, 2015
  • Harry Krejsa
  • Op-eds

Does China Needs Its Own 'Womenomics'?

Any economist will tell you that failing to integrate half of a country’s population into the workforce is economic nonsense — a needless expense that permanently limits growth and prospects for innovation. The IMF estimates that workforce gender discrimination costs the global economy almost $1.6...

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  • November 26, 2015
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
  • Op-eds

How China Benefits From Global Sanctions

Over the past several years, major multilateral sanctions have been aimed at regimes that threaten global security, from Russia to North Korea to Iran. China has been neither the architect nor the target of these sanctions. More often, it’s a reluctant partner behind the U.S. and European Union....

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  • November 24, 2015
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg, Robert D. Kaplan
  • Op-eds

Time to Act on Ukraine

The Ukraine crisis, though temporarily out of the headlines, is at a critical stage. There is no better opportunity than now through the next several months to forge a deal with Russia advantageous to American interests. The Europeans may very well not extend sanctions after the first half of 2016...

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  • November 19, 2015
  • Eric Lorber, Peter Feaver
  • Reports

Diminishing Returns? The Future of Economic Coercion

Eric Lorber, an Adjunct Fellow in the Energy, Economics, and Security Program, and Peter Feaver, a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Duke University, have written a new report, “Diminishing Returns? The Future of Economic Coercion.” The report lays out the success of recent...

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