Energy, Economics and Security

The Energy, Economics and Security program analyzes the changing global marketplace and implications for U.S. national security and foreign policy. Shifting energy dynamics, the geopolitical challenges associated with a changing climate and powerful economic forces all shape U.S. global leadership. In a highly interconnected global system, leaders must increasingly leverage energy and financial assets to defend and promote U.S. national interests. The Energy, Economics and Security program develops practical strategies to help decision-makers understand, anticipate and respond.

The Energy, Economics and Security Team

Related Content

  • August 7, 2015
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
  • In the News

RPT-INSIGHT-U.S. agency overseeing sanctions faces brain drain, added work

Aug 7 (Reuters) - As Congress considers a controversial nuclear deal with Iran, the U.S. Treasury agency charged with implementing related financial sanctions is at risk of being overwhelmed by its expanding mission, former employees and lawyers who deal with the office say. The agency, the Office...

Read More

  • August 5, 2015
  • Peter Harrell
  • In the News

The New Middle East

Mobile phones in Tehran started beeping and buzzing well before Iran’s nuclear agreement with the West was finalised on 14 July in Vienna. They carried an important sentiment that couldn’t wait for the niggling details to be ironed out in the talks between Iran, on one side, and China, France,...

Read More

  • August 3, 2015
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
  • In the News

Post nuclear deal contracts with Iran will not be exempt from snap-back sanctions: sources

Companies that sign contracts with Iran after the nuclear deal is implemented would not be "grandfathered in" automatically and would have to wind down their work there if the US snap backs sanctions on Tehran, according analysts and persons familiar with the Obama administration's plans to...

Read More

  • July 29, 2015
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
  • In the News

Are there really only two options on Iran?

Ever since negotiators finished work on a nuclear agreement with Iran, President Obama and his aides have been fending off critics with a recurring refrain: What's the alternative? "There's no alternative that you or anybody else has proposed," Secretary of State John F. Kerry lectured Sen. Marco...

Read More

  • July 28, 2015
  • Michele Flournoy
  • Congressional Testimony

Michèle Flournoy before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs

CNAS Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer Michèle Flournoy testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs on the national security implications of lifting the crude oil export ban.

Read More

  • July 21, 2015
  • Events

Iran and the Future of the Regional Security and Economic Landscape

  Iran and the Future of theRegional Security and Economic Landscape Featuring a keynote address by: Jon WolfsthalSenior Director for Arms Control and Nonproliferation at the National Security Council And panel discussions on: Panel One: The Iran Nuclear Deal's Regional Impact Dr. Suzanne...

Read More

  • July 16, 2015
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
  • In the News

Could Obama Have Gotten More From Iran With Additional, Crippling Sanctions?

WASHINGTON – Critics of the nuclear deal that major world powers struck with Iran this week have largely based their case on a counterfactual. Had President Barack Obama imposed sanctions on Iran that were more aggressive -- “crippling,” even -- then, the theory goes, he would have extracted more...

Read More

  • July 14, 2015
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
  • Op-eds

How Promoting Business in Iran Boosts the Nuclear Agreement

The United States and international partners have signed a historic agreement with Iran on its nuclear program, but they still face important choices about just how far to go in allowing Iran back into the global economy. In the short term, U.S. companies will be limited in their ability to join...

Read More

  • July 14, 2015
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
  • In the News

For U.S. firms, the Iran deal means pistachios, airline parts and carpets

For American corporations, the Iran nuclear deal starts with pistachios, caviar, carpets and airplanes — and could mean more. For American consumers, the deal could mean slightly lower oil prices, but not until next year, as limits on Iranian crude oil exports are lifted. But for Iran, the nuclear...

Read More

  • June 23, 2015
  • Dr. David Gordon
  • Congressional Testimony

Dr. David F. Gordon before Senate Committee on Foreign Relations

Dr. David F. Gordon, adjunct senior fellow at CNAS, testified before the Subcommittee on Multilateral International Development, Multilateral Institutions, and International Economic, Energy and Environmental Policy on opportunities for U.S. allies and U.S. national security. Dr. Gordon concluded...

Read More

Pages