February 21, 2018

Seeking to outsmart US, China races ahead on artificial intelligence

Featuring Elsa B. Kania

Source: McClatchy DC News

Journalist Tim Johnson

WASHINGTON: When a Google computer program beat the world’s best player of an ancient Chinese board game last May, it might have seemed like an incremental milestone.

But for some, the success of the program known as AlphaGo marked more than a man vs. machine clash. It set up a broader race between China and the United States over artificial intelligence, a competition that could mold the future of humankind just as the widespread arrival of electricity did in the last century.

The Go tournament took place in Wuzhen, a city of canals that is more than 1,300 years old, a fitting venue for a competition involving the strategy board game Go that has been played for several thousand years. Go is renowned for its complexity, and it is said that there are more variations to the game than there are atoms in the universe.

Read the full article in McClatchy DC News.

  • Elsa B. Kania

    Adjunct Fellow, Technology and National Security Program

    Elsa B. Kania is an Adjunct Fellow with the Technology and National Security Program at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS). Her research focuses on Chinese military...