Sanctions by the Numbers

About this series

Each month, the Sanctions by the Numbers newsletter and series offers comprehensive analysis and visualization of major patterns, changes, and developments in U.S. sanctions policy and economic statecraft. Each edition highlights key thematic issues in sanctions policy, such as human rights and corruption, as well as geographical regions like Iran, China, Russia, and North Korea.

The Sanctions by the Numbers series provides data-driven insights about key trends in U.S. sanctions policy, serving as a resource for economic and trade coverage by The Wall Street Journal, Reuters, Axios, and other leading media outlets. Originally launched as a set of online commentaries in February 2020, the series presents key findings from an ongoing data-tracking project conducted by the CNAS Energy, Economics, and Security Program. Members of the program collect and analyze sanctions data from publicly available government sources, such as the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC).

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Explore the series

Energy, Economics, & Security

Sanctions by the Numbers: U.S. Secondary Sanctions

Over the past decade, secondary sanctions have emerged as a critical—and sometimes controversial—tool to increase the effectiveness and reach of U.S. primary sanctions program...

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Energy, Economics, & Security

Sanctions by the Numbers: Spotlight on Venezuela

As Venezuela battles a protracted financial and humanitarian crisis, U.S. sanctions on the country have emerged as controversial. This has sparked debate on whether the increa...

Energy, Economics, & Security

Sanctions by the Numbers: Spotlight on Cyber Sanctions

Cyberattacks pose a serious threat to U.S. national security and the integrity of the global commerce and financial system, especially when state-sponsored actors conduct and/...

Energy, Economics, & Security

Sanctions by the Numbers: Spotlight on Human Rights and Corruption

Over the past five years, the U.S. government has imposed an unprecedented number of human rights and corruption-related sanctions....

Energy, Economics, & Security

Sanctions by the Numbers: Spotlight on North Korea

The U.S. government has used a variety of coercive economic measures to combat the North Korean security threat....

Energy, Economics, & Security

Sanctions by the Numbers: Spotlight on Russia

Russia is the second-most sanctioned state by the United States in the past decade, with 742 designations....

Energy, Economics, & Security

Sanctions by the Numbers: 2020 Year in Review

Sanctions designations remained high in 2020, with 777 designations compared to 785 in 2019....

Energy, Economics, & Security

Sanctions by the Numbers: Spotlight on China

The United States has significantly increased its sanctions designations on Chinese individuals, entities, and ships in 2020. While the United States has imposed sanctions on ...

Energy, Economics, & Security

Sanctions by the Numbers: Spotlight on Iran

This edition of Sanctions by the Numbers explores Iran sanctions, tracking how designations and delistings have evolved over time, the dozens of countries affected by Iran-rel...

Energy, Economics, & Security

Sanctions by the Numbers: The Geographic Distribution of U.S. Sanctions

In February, CNAS launched Sanctions by the Numbers, a project to track U.S. sanctions designations and delistings. In this second installment, heat maps show the most heavily...

Energy, Economics, & Security

Sanctions by the Numbers: U.S. Sanctions Designations and Delistings, 2009–2019

The United States uses financial sanctions as a prominent tool of foreign policy. While this tool is used with increasing frequency and popularity, there is relatively limited...

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